Shingles + Wood Siding: Stain vs. Paint?

All about outside your bungalow.
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Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2003 1:31 pm
Location: West Adams area of Los Angeles
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2003 11:04 am
Are there any benefits to using paint on wood shingles and clapboard siding instead of a stain? Do people use stains mainly for the visual effect? Does paint last longer? Just curious...
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2003 1:45 pm
TOH magazine has an article on exterior stains this month. It may be helpful.
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2003 6:20 pm
I think the biggest benefit to stain versus paint is that stain doesn't crack or peel or anything like that. It may fade and need to be spruced up once in a while, but you don't have to do all the scraping and extensive prep work with stain. At least that's been my experience.
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Location: West Adams area of Los Angeles
PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2003 2:12 pm
Thanks for the info.
PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2003 4:13 pm
terry of new orleans <br> in regards to paint vs. stain . <br> <br> stain does not protect from the elements as paint does . <br>think about it stain is absorbedinto the wood and paint forms a film over the exterior of the siding . <br> <br> although you may derive some savings in the staining because it eliminates the sanding and someprepwork ,and possibly paint disposal , when the uv inhibitors in the stai are gone so are your weatherboars. its been my experience that a good sanding , renailing, priming of nail heads ,filling,allinging of weatherboards and replacement of bamaged weatherboards is best either for stain or paint <br>and definitly dont skimp on caulk . <br> personally i find paint superior to stain in obtaining that elusive 20 year paint job . <br> if your going to do the work ,or pay to have it done ,why not get the best job you can so you dont have to do it again anytime soon . best of luck
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Location: Mount Holly, NJ
PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2003 11:13 am
Geepers! Is there really such a thing as a 20 yr paint job??? We'll be painting the ouside of our house soon and I would love for it to last that long!!! Linda
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2003 2:51 pm
When I lived in Colorado I had a home with cedar siding. The intensity of the sun is murder on wood out there because of the elevation. We just used a natural colored oil preservative (I think it was Behr) and applied it every few years. The house looked great and it was a really simple process since we just sprayed it on with a garden type sprayer or rolled it on with a paint roller. Regardless of whether you paint or stain you need to give attention to things like caulking and the stability of the siding, etc. In the last three houses I've lived in (since the cedar house) I've had problems with paint peeling, fading, etc. The cedar home was the easiest maintenance I've ever had on a house and if I had the choice that's what I would pick, especially with the broad range of colors now available in stain. It is, however, a more rustic look and may not be as suitable for some styles.
PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2003 7:06 am
We are up against a major mess with our house concerning paint or stain. The main problem is that the previous owner wasn't much on upkeep and hired cheap painters many years ago. The stained small roofs on the sides of our house will be the easiest to deal with (scraping them is a dream compared to the painted areas). If this makes any difference, the top part of our 1912 bungalow hybrid is shingle, with most of the bottom, iron-spotted brick. The current, peeling paint is pretty thick in some areas on the shingles and is peeling badly in the more weather exposed areas, plus we'll have to replace a few shingles, but not nearly enough to redo the entire house. <br> <br>Personnally, I like the look of stain, as we had to re-roof one of the side areas- it looks great!), but will have to paint over the already painted majority of our home and may have to paint over this as well to match. Someone suggested once that we take all the shingles off and turn them over, but my husband is concerned that too many will break getting these nails out in the process (from his experience with the smaller roof). Plus the shingling involves many curved surfaces at the corners that we'd rather not mess with, since originally, they did a beautiful job shingling our home. <br> <br>So what to do? Is there a way to strip the paint off without damaging the cedar shingles and then re-applying paint to gain back some of the texture? Can we attempt this ourselves? Should we? (I don't want to sand the shingles as we will lose any texture that we have left and am not into the man-made shingle-look alikes as replacement.) We need to do something this year as it looks pretty bad. I am also anxious to change the "posted-note" yellow color of these shingles to something that will compliment better with the brick. We appreciate any advise you have. Thanks! <br> <br>Lisa
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2003 9:35 am
Lisa, <br>Sounds like you do have a mess on your hands! I'm by no means an expert, but have a couple suggestions. How much of the paint do you think a pressure wash will take off? If the paint is in really bad shape, maybe that would get most of it off and then scraping the rest with a paint scraper or wire brush (in the direction of the shingle grain) may get the rest off. I've read that pressure washes in inexperienced hands can wreak havoc on old materials, so maybe asking a pro to do that would be best. Using the peel away type paint removers might also work, but would be prohibitively expensive to use on large surface areas, I would think. But maybe if the other techniques got most of it off, using the peel away stuff on just the worst areas might be more affordable. <br> <br>Good luck! Some days I'm grateful we have stucco and just need to deal with painting window trim and porches.
PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2003 1:15 pm
Thanks Bec! We have thought of a light pressure washing too (low psi, tested on other wood shingles first, or possibly from a pro), but hadn't thought of using a wire brush in the direction of the grain. I was concerned that this might hurt the shingles, but may be a bit over-cautious here. <br> <br>Currently-jealous-of-stucco-homeowners:-), <br>Lisa
PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2003 2:30 pm
I live in Bungalow Heaven, a historical landmark district with many bungalows. Stained bungalows are rare in our neighborhood but most folks find them pretty cool. There are three on my street and I'd hate to see them get painted over. I wish mine wasn't painted. The Gamble House is in the process of trying to get back to the original look of the house but it will be a costly endeavor. Out here, stained bungalows are desirable. <br>

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 3:41 am
Hi
I want to paint my doors in my house as if they are stained. They are currently painted white. Do they sell a paint that looks like stain?
Can I stain a door that is already painted? Thank you.

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Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2012 1:18 am
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 12:30 am
If you paint with a latex paint those stains may bleed through unless you use a stain lock sealer first. The "natural" old shingles will probably already have tanning stains thus a sealer.

In that you have replaced some with new ones then for consistency you will need to use a solid color stain. A transparent stain will make the new shingles stand out like a sore thumb.
http://www.vitalwares.ca/

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PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2014 8:45 pm
Well, not to mentions stains adds more impression, I prefer stains to be used to any exteriors including doors. I have this type of door from caldwells.com, I did slight modification by adding stain glass into it. Not only provide lighter view from the inside but also a artistic look outside because of the unique stain design.
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