Paint color choice to match house style?

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Posts: 5450
Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2002 2:01 pm
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2002 3:14 pm
Well, I finally got a picture to go with my question here - We are painting our bungalow influenced house built around 1912. We are still unsure of what type it is - with it's brick-bays/shingle combination (the shingles curve outward slightly above the brick on each end). I would like to go with more earthy colors but want to stay within it's style. Any suggestions or directions we could take? <br> <br>house pics <br>http://www.geocities.com/queencitysue/house.html <br>

Posts: 5450
Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2002 2:01 pm
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2002 3:14 pm
I can't help you with colors, but I LOVE your house! Please show us when you are finished. Inside pics, too! <br> <br> <br> <br>

Posts: 5450
Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2002 2:01 pm
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2002 3:14 pm
Gladly. I am leaning toward a cream/putty lighter color for the trim, a darker version of this for the shingles and the window-"grids" being a mossy-green- being the darkest color. (wish I could stain it all, but the shingles are still good and they've been unfortunatly been painted. Does this sound like I'm on track? <br> <br>

Posts: 5450
Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2002 2:01 pm
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2002 3:15 pm
I'd say your house is definitely a bungalow. As for your color scheme, I'd say you're definitely on track. We have been in the process of painting my 1919 Four-square for about three years. I've read (don't recall exactly where) that a 3-color scheme was common on homes of our vintage. We did our stucco (2nd story) in a light beige, our soffit &amp; fascia in a dark beige, and did miscellaneous trim in a light brown. By miscellaneous trim, I mean cornice brackets around the house and on the dormers. We've gotten a lot of compliments. <br> <br>For yours, I'd suggest using your lightest color on the largest area - the shingles on the gable ends. Then go with your intermediate color on window trim (frames and sills). Go back to your lightest color for the window muntins (grids). Not that your mossy green is really dark, but I've also read that keeping the muntins a light color keeps them from absorbing a lot of heat which would lead to pre-maturely drying out the glazing. You could try your darkest (green) color on your cornice brackets along the main roof, dormer, and front porch. <br> <br>Good luck. The planning only seems difficult until you start doing the work. <br> <br>

Posts: 5450
Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2002 2:01 pm
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2002 3:15 pm
Thanks for your advise. Wow, I thought the muntins were almost always dark on bungalows? (I was told this at a house tour for a craftsman- inspired four-square brick home.) Therefore I never tried a test going back to the lighter on the muntins. Hmmmm.... having Photoshop, I'll have to put some altered pictures on my website of each choice. Thanks again! <br>

Posts: 5450
Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2002 2:01 pm
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2002 3:16 pm
I set up an A, B, and C choice on my address (on the first question in this series). I put them in black and white because I'm pretty sick of dealing with colors until I figure out the values of each area first. Any help is greatly appreciated! <br>

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